Tag Archives: marketing consultant in st albans

Is Periscope on your radar?

There seems to have been quite a lot of noise about live video streaming services over the last week or so, since Twitter-owned Periscope launched, inviting us to “Explore the world through someone else’s eyes”.

Video streaming has been hitting the headlines since Meerkat was the talk of this year’s SXSW. I have to confess this totally passed me by, but as a Twitter user, I found out about the launch of Periscope so decided to have a look and see what it was all about.

If you’ve not had chance to download and have a play yet, here are some screen grabs from the iOS app (not available on android at time of writing). I’ve chosen an example from the folks at Mashable to help demonstrate the app’s potential for marketing and engagement.

IMG_5176 IMG_5169 (1) 2015-04-02 17.24.40

You can tell it’s in a very early stage of experimentation by many users, with ‘test’ or ‘view from [location]’ type titles of the streams, but I’ve already watched useful broadcasts from Guardian Tech and Mashable that help showcase its potential. Viewers of these live broadcasts can make comments or show their ‘love’ by tapping the screen and generating a heart which floats up the screen along with those of other viewers.

It’s clearly very early days, and I’d expect to see lots more updates over the coming weeks, but here’s my first take on the pros and cons that I can see a week or so in, along with a glimpse into what the future may hold…

Pros

Even at this early stage, I can see some pretty significant upsides to this platform, including

  • Speed to market: being able to broadcast and view live video streams pretty much ‘on demand’ will be a huge benefit to organisations and brands that want to get a live video in front of their audience fast
  • Authenticity: What you see is what you get…in real-time. No editing or polishing, broadcasters respond in real-time to the comments
  • Accessibility: Without the need to invest in any expensive kit above a decent iPhone, even the smallest of business can use the platform to engage with their target audience using the medium of video

Cons

For the time being, though, these are offset by some pretty significant cons.

  • Search: At the moment, it seems that you can search for users but not content. This seems a pretty fundamental flaw for me, as discovery of new users to follow will be driven by [for me, anyway] by an interest in certain types of content, language or even location. The home screen of the app is too random at present – a list that is crying out to be filtered into a curated list of stuff I actually might find interesting, that I can choose.
  • Bandwidth: On more than one occasion, on separate streams, I’ve seen ‘broadcast too full’ with as few as 157 [see below] live viewers of a stream. Again, I’d hope that this would be something that gets improved over time as more people adopt the platform.

Periscope bandwidth issuePeriscope bandwidth

I’m left with no doubt that the ability to video stream in real time has lots of exciting possibilities but, as with all forms of social media, the starting point has to be in how best to deliver benefits for the audience. One good example I’ve seen is from @pauljholden, a Comic Artist on Judge Dredd who I’ve seen broadcast a couple of times, answering questions whilst you can see him at work.

As with any form of social media channel, I’d always recommend to clients that they should listen, observe and learn about any platform before diving in. The focus on live video streaming (of any flavour) will only gather pace over the coming weeks and months as brands begin to experiment and find the use case best suited to their audience.

I’ll return to this in a later post, but in the meantime I’d love to hear from anyone who is thinking of incorporating Periscope (or Meerkat) into their communications plans. Where do you see the opportunities and potential pitfalls?

The role of trust in content marketing

Life these days can be so complex, we don’t make the time to stop and reflect*.

In a recent piece in The Observer, Why the modern world is bad for your brainDaniel J Levitin opens with

“Our brains are busier than ever before. We’re assaulted with facts, pseudo facts, jibber-jabber, and rumour, all posing as information. Trying to figure out what you need to know and what you can ignore is exhausting.”

Two words immediately sprang to mind as I read this. Content marketing.

In this increasingly content-rich, multi-media, everyone-is-a-publisher world we live in, the rate of increase in additional information available to B2B buyers has exponentially outpaced the increase in the amount of time available to digest and process it.

Maybe it’s because I’m a marketer that I notice the ever-increasing tsunami of lead generation bait-disguised-as-content. You’ve all seen them – “3 reasons why these 7 killer tips will transform your business in 10 ways. Download this white paper today!” I exaggerate for effect. A bit.

Often, the content is flimsy and doesn’t live up to the hype of the headline. Yes, you’ve got my attention but is what you have to say worth hearing? Will it add real value to my day-to-day life? Does it address a common issue or problem faced by people like me? No? Then you’ve lost me and you’ve lost my trust. And if I don’t trust you I’m certainly not going to buy from you.

shutterstock_134893019 (2)

Worse still, your actions may have made me a little less trusting of content I see from other brands. So poorly conceived content marketing has the potential to undermine the trust  in (and thereby the effectiveness of) the technique for everyone.

Insights from the excellent Edelman Trust Barometer 2015** suggests trust may already be a barrier to overcome for brands seeking to acquire new customers – with over 2/3 of respondents distrusting content created by brands they do not currently use:

Edelman trust barometer - content creators

So what can marketers do to build trust into their content marketing efforts?

Here’s 3 thoughts to get the ball rolling:

  1. Make sure the content truly lives up to the promise of the headline – think more broadsheet, less tabloid.
  2. Make sure the headline addresses a known, real customer issue or pain point – not only will this help achieve cut through, this will also help your target audience to find it online (search engines were the most trusted source of general information and news in the Edelman survey)
  3. Make sure you understand the buyer’s landscape – do you know what trade publications or academics are relevant to your target audience? Can you partner with them to co-create content? Such a third-party endorsement from a trusted source will help provide validation of your content (and keep you honest in generating truly excellent work to boot)

How is your organisation using content marketing to build trust with your prospect base? Have you seen any particularly good examples of content marketing in practice? I’d love to hear from anyone with experiences and best practice to share.

**Here’s the Edelman Trust Barometer 2015

*with thanks to the Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy

Sage: Trade Show Marketing how it should be done

I was at the Business Start-Up Show recently, a trade show with seminars and over 300 exhibitors targeting the small and start-up business market. I stopped by a number of stands that day, and although I was there as a ‘punter’, I couldn’t help but keep putting my B2B Marketing hat back on to critique their performance.

One business that stood out as the most impressive that day has to be Sage. As you’ll see below, from a delegate perspective they were excellent, but as a B2B Marketer myself, you could tell they had a clear and structured plan for engaging with their audience before, during and after the show:

Before:

I had pre-registered for the Business Planning Workshop that Sage were running as part of the extensive seminar programme. I was booked onto the 10.30am slot, on the first day of the show.

I got to Earls Court early, but had to take a phone call that I didn’t want to take in a queue of people, so was only able to join the substantial queue at 09.45, with doors opening at 10.00.

By about 10.15 it became clear that the queue wasn’t moving (except in length) and I was hoping that someone inside was listening when I tweeted:

Clearly, the marketing team at Sage were geared up for engaging with customers and prospects, and tweeted back, which started a conversation with the brand before I had even got into the building.

Fortunately, soon after, common sense prevailed and the organisers started letting pre-registered delegates through en masse without signing-in. I managed to get through to the Sage stand where I was met with a friendly smile and a member of staff that personally escorted me to the Business Planning Workshop, which was about to commence.

During:

The workshop was very useful, and with free planning software as a giveaway, I definitely wanted to find out more about what Sage offered as I had traditionally associated them with accounting software.

Their exhibition space was well laid out, open and inviting. There were well signposted zones for information on various product types, and I found the people friendly, knowledgeable and engaging.

Sage stand at Business Start Up 2011, Earls CourtSage stand at Business Start Up 2011, Earls Court (2)I received a demo on Sage Act! from a member of staff who was extremely patient as he ran through the demo and answered my questions.

It would have been the easiest thing in the world to push for a sale, after a 40 minute demo, but it felt to me like the strategy for the day was engagement and lead generation. I happily gave my contact details and agreed to receive a follow-up.

After visiting maybe a dozen or so other stands (and walking past all others), most appeared to lack any kind of clear strategy.

So impressed was I with my Sage experience, that on the way out, I tweeted the following, which was amplified across the business show audience by 6 retweets:

After:

A day or two later, I got a follow-up email from someone introducing themselves as my account manager, with their contact details should I have any other questions.

A couple of weeks on, I received the attached follow-up email to invite me to a webinar, the creative linking back to the exhibition and signposting a discount offer unique to attendees of the show.

Screen grab of Sage email follow-up, including show-specific discount offer

I signed up for the webinar, and had another demo today. For me, the picture is complete and I now have all the information I need and will be buying Sage Act! at some point soon.

Get a life! Why are you reviewing a trade show?!

All too often in my experience, exhibitions are criticised as a waste of money, time or both. From what I saw on the day, I’m sure for many exhibitors this was true.

However, as Sage have shown, the key to successful exhibition marketing is to have a strategy for engaging with your customers and prospects Before, During and After the show, exhibition or event.

Well done Sage, and thanks for supplying the photos of the exhibition stand and agreeing for their use in this post.

What do you think? Are you in sales or marketing and have any trade show marketing tips to share? How does your business maximise the return on investment from trade shows? I’d love to hear your thoughts.