Tag Archives: ‘digital marketing’

Giving marketing a rebrand- step 2

Last week’s post on giving marketing a rebrand coincided with a piece on a similar theme in Marketing Week and was picked up and included in their Storify.

I suggested that there are three steps marketers can take to raise their profile, credibility and effectiveness. Step 1 called on them to Fight The Fluff.

English: Oriental Magpie Robin മലയാളം: മണ്ണാത്...

Image via Wikipedia

In Step 2, I’m suggesting that marketers should Manage the Magpie.Some are afflicted by the desire for the latest shiny new thing, whether it’s the latest technology gadget, social media platform or marketing technique. With advances in technology disrupting many traditional business models, there’s no doubt it’s an incredibly exciting time to be in business, never mind marketing.

Yet for many, this excitement causes a common sense bypass! Some are blinded by the brightness of the new thing, whilst others jump onto the ‘me too’ bandwagon to seek the reassurance that if other/bigger/more interesting brands are doing something, so should we.

Expectations and excitement skyrocket as early successes from case studies (most likely from outside your sector and country, but don’t let details like that get in the way) start to emerge as ‘proof’ that the cynical doubters are wrong. But of course what goes up must come down and when the glitter fades and the post-hysteria hangover kicks in, you wake up in what Gartner call the ‘trough of disillusionment’.

Which is why, more than ever before, marketers need to be better at managing the magpie within themselves and others. They should make a focused, objective and dispassionate assessment before leaping in. Yes be curious. Absolutely be alert to changing trends. But always be asking ‘how will this improve the customer experience’.

To put an objective structure around your thinking, try the following

  1. build an informal, cross-functional group from sales, marketing and operations so that you can draw upon the wider experience in the business when a shiny new thing comes along
  2. get them to help you define at least three ways in which it will measurably improve the customer experience.
  3. the harder you find this, the easier the decision not to jump on

Do you look before you leap onto the latest shiny new bandwagon? How do you decide which new technologies to adopt and at what speed? Or maybe you work for a magpie and have some coping mechanisms to share here?

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Has the world gone QRazy?

A giant QR Code linking to a website, to be re...

Image via Wikipedia

There’s been a common-sense bypass for many in the recent race to use QR Codes in marketing campaigns. Sadly, as is often the case in the profession I love, common business sense goes out of the window in the rush to implement the latest cool and shiny thing.

A recent article in Marketing Week revealed that only just over 1 in 10 consumers had used a QR code in the past, less than half of whom found them useful and would like to see them more widely available. Apathy was found to be a barrier to adoption, cited by 23% of respondents to the survey.

I know how they feel. In the right circumstances, for the right type of application, QR Codes have very interesting potential, but only if:

  1. The objective is to drive offline customers online for deeper brand engagement or to convert them (to sale, to registration, to download)
  2. There is a high penetration of smart phone owners amongst your target audience
  3. The placement of the code is conducive to easy/safe scanning and represents a better customer experience than responding via other channels

So, there are two recent examples that have left me scratching my head.

Firstly, my local authority  recently announced they are “trialling QR codes on our signs to keep people more informed about road works.” The facebook photo shows what appears to be a sheet of A4 paper sellotaped to a road sign.

I’d argue that the vast majority of people inconvenienced by road works are motorists. So how easy or safe is it to scan a QR code when driving, never mind how legal? A-ha, they’re one step ahead of me:

“The technology can only be used by pedestrians or cyclists, as users need to scan the code with their mobile phone, so it suits schemes like temporary pavement and cycleway closures.”

I’m not convinced.

Then I saw what appeared to be a poster ad for Investec Bank, who have for a number of years used a Zebra as part of their visual identity.

Closer inspection revealed that it was actually a poster for Intel under the “Visibly Smart” campaign, where a QR Code had been made to incorporate the Zebra’s eye. This would have made a great magazine ad creative…for Investec, but a roadside poster for Intel with an unscannable QR Code?

Do you have any examples of particularly good or bad practice in this area? Will we still be talking about QR Codes in 12 months time, or is this a fad for bored marketers with post-recession budget cuts and ‘free’ toys to play with?  I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Can Digital Immigrants learn the right to residency?

There’s a lovely quote I heard for the first time at a recent presentation by David Rowan:

 “Anything invented before your fifteenth birthday is the order of nature. That’s how it should be. Anything invented between your 15th and 35th birthday is new and exciting, and you might get a career there. Anything invented after that day, however, is against nature and should be prohibited.”

Douglas Adams

Source: http://www.famousquotesabout.com/quote/Anything-invented-before-your/74844#ixzz1JQelGyKL

This made me laugh out loud. Then it made me think (as did the rest of David’s presentation, which was excellent). Although I like to consider myself relatively tech-savvy, I’m approaching 40 and am therefore a Digital Immigrant. Yet I’m fascinated by the potential within the digital world that is developing at speed around us, and want to understand what makes the business decision makers of tomorrow (the Digital Natives) tick. As a B2B Marketer, how can I not be?

So last year I went back to school for the first time in over 10 years and completed the CAM Foundation’s Digital Marketing Planning Award (via online distance learning, of course!). Whilst it gave me a great refresher in marketing planning, my background and wider reading really ignited a passion to find out more about how the digital world continues to evolve.

Since then, I’ve slowly built Twitter connections with c.100 people around the world, along with a small but growing readership of this blog, with over 200 views a month. I will never be a Digital Native, but I can learn more about the customs and language of the new world I find myself in.

As my interest in the development, usage and integration of digital tools into mainstream marketing has continued to grow, I’ve decided to take the plunge and study for the Digital Marketing Essentials Award, which will give me  a focus to my learning whilst allowing me to complete the Diploma in Digital Marketing.

As well as posting updates on this blog, I’ll also be sharing any interesting insights I glean as part of my studies via my Twitter feed. I hope you find them interesting and useful.

Digital- hype or high potential?

I was delighted to be asked to join a panel discussion on a recent CIM Webcast earlier this month entitled “Digital- what hasn’t happened yet- the shape of digital to come?’

Moderated by Thomas Brown, Head of Insights for CIM, the panel consisted of Mark Stuart, Head of Research for CIM, Mark Inskip, Digital Director EMEA, Accenture, and myself in the guise of a B2B Marketing practitioner.

The webcast can be accessed from this link, hosted by Thomson Reuters http://tinyurl.com/33xpsvq.

Whilst there’s no doubt that the online environment will continue to evolve at pace, there are some basic questions that any business needs to ask itself before embarking on a digital engagement programme:

1. Do I have a detailed profile of my ‘ideal’ customer[s]? 

If not, build one and make it personal- give them a name and refer to them in internal meetings and agency briefings.

2. Do I understand the media consumption habits of my ideal customer?

Do I know what they read, where they read it, and how they read it? Are they online? How much, and for what purpose? Which sites and/or social networking platforms do they use, and why?

3. Does my product/service really lend itself to using these new channels for communication and engagement with my target audience?

 I love this cartoon by Tom Fishburne http://tinyurl.com/39m5t9v which I believe should be compulsory viewing for everyone thinking about embarking on a social media journey.

This by no means exhaustive, but unless you answer ‘yes’ to every question, you should stop and reconsider.